Al Qaida

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Al Qaida

A terrorist organization founded in the late 1980s. It was established in Pakistan to fight against the Soviets in Afghanistan. Its ideology is based on a certain interpretation of the writings of Sayid Qutb, who argued that "true" Islam had been lost over the years and has to be recovered. It is best known for the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which, among other things, destroyed the World Trade Center in the United States and served as the impetus for subsequent American wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Since 2001, Al Qaida has become more decentralized, with various otherwise unrelated groups claiming the name as they conduct terrorist or other activities in different countries.
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Moreover, al Qaeda's idea that violence can spark a global clash of cultures tends to obscure the need to understand local conditions where the group hopes to nurture branch al Qaeda movements.
19 Al Qaeda terrorists hijack four planes and use them as missiles, striking the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
Gonzales's lawyers contend that the Hamdi decision affirms that the Congressional authorization of force "gave its express approval to the military conflict against Al Qaeda and its allies and thereby to the President's use of all traditional accepted incidents of force in this current military conflict--including warrantless electronic surveillance to intercept enemy communications both at home and abroad.
This attack was also perpetrated by Al Qaeda and directly supervised by Osama bin Laden himself.
The story about the Al Qaeda fleet came from none other than The Washington Post.
Jordanian Terrorist Abu Musab Al Zarqawi Founded Al Qaeda In Iraq And Pledged Allegiance To Osama Bin Laden.
One of his followers was Osama Bin Laden, who learned about fundraising and organization from Azzam then established a separate organization called Al Qaeda.
And, while the French-led military operation in Mali and an African Union campaign in Somalia have pushed back Al Qaeda militants, the Syrian civil war has seen hundreds of foreign volunteers join the cause there.
On the contrary, Keane said, al Qaeda has deliberately decentralized its operations because its strategic objective is to dominate and control Muslim countries in the region.
By 2007, Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) had appeared as well.
Al Qaeda's affiliate in Yemen, known as al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), is believed to have several hundred of fighters hidden in the mountainous regions of the country, and the Obama administration has dramatically stepped up its aid to Yemen's military to uproot it.
In general, Al Qaeda speaks in a very triumphant tone but in the new book Al-Libi speaks of the group's dire straits and serious problems," said Daniel Lev, who works for MEMRI.