Akio Morita


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Akio Morita

A businessman who co-founded Sony. Trained in the family business of soy and sake, Morita established what became Sony in 1946 with Masaru Ibuka, whom he met during World War II. In 1950, Sony introduced the first tape recorder in Japan and went on to become a major electronics company. Morita remained chairman of Sony until 1994. He lived from 1921 until 1999.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bueno, por fin, voy a hablar del futuro, para ello, que mejor que comenzar con la siguiente frase de Akio Morita, fisico y empresario japones, emprendedor e innovador por naturaleza, cofundador de Sony y durante muchos anos identificado con el progreso tecnologico y empresarial de Japon: "Por supuesto que tenemos que hacer un beneficio, pero tiene que ser a largo plazo, no solo a corto plazo, y eso significa que debemos seguir invirtiendo en investigacion y desarrollo ".
Rigby, an independent journalist in the UK who writes for business publications, profiles 28 thinkers who have impacted their industries and changed the way business is done, including Oprah Winfrey, Mark Zuckerburg, Mary Kay Ash, Peter Drucker, Steve Jobs, Richard Branson, Warren Buffett, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, Rupert Murdoch, Sam Walton, Bill Gates, David Ogilvy, Michael Dell, and Akio Morita.
Back when Sony, led by co-founder Akio Morita, launched the Walkman, it proved an inspiration to the founders of the then little known startup company: Apple Computers.
Chaudhuri had also referred to how Akio Morita, founder of the Japanese electronics giant Sony, started his company with the big dream to have his country's flag flutter high on US soil.
For example, while Akio Morita, the future CEO of Sony, worked in his "'office', he had to duck under the neighbors' clotheslines, often festooned with baby diapers.
When Akio Morita, founder of the Sony Corporation, said: "Failure - I encourage it wherever I can," he meant that some of the best innovation occurs when talented people have a free rein to explore new ideas.
In the letter I quoted from a lecture given in 1992 by Akio Morita, the founder of Sony, which still seems to encapsulate the UK problem with science, engineering and technology.
Many years ago, Sony founder Akio Morita wrote an international best seller, Made in Japan.
Imagine, for a moment, that Akio Morita, the legendary founder of Sony Corporation, had gone to work for General Electric's Japanese subsidiary in 1946 instead of gathering his small staff in a bombed-out Tokyo factory to manufacture electric rice cookers, Sony's very first product.
Before the pic unspooled, Sony CEO Howard Stringer dedicated the preem to the three men who had preceded him as Sony topper, beginning with Akio Morita, who built the company to a world electronic powerhouse.
But as Sony CEO Akio Morita put it, "Although I originally thought it would be considered rude for one person to be listening to his music in isolation, buyers began to see their little portable stereo sets as very personal.
As former Sony chief Akio Morita once said, "That world power that loses its manufacturing capacity will cease to be a world power.