Age Discrimination in Employment Act

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Age Discrimination in Employment Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1967, that forbids discrimination against persons over the age of 40 in the hiring or firing of, and the distribution of benefits to, employees. The Act was deemed necessary because some employers were unlikely to hire otherwise qualified applicants because they were closer to retirement and therefore less likely to stay with the company. It provides for reinstatement and back pay for employees against whom companies have discriminated.
References in periodicals archive ?
The EEOC is also responsible for enforcing the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended; the Equal Pay Act of 1963; and Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
2159 (1995), the Court held that damages recovered under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 were not based on a tort-like claim and, therefore, not excludible from gross income.
Law students from 34 law schools from every region of the country competed in the written and oral phases of the Competition, arguing a moot case arising under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.
2159 (1995), addressed whether back pay and liquidated damages awarded under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) were excludible from gross income under Sec.
The 89 students in this year's competition will test their mettle in written and oral advocacy by arguing a moot case arising under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.
104(a)(2) exclusion of damages from gross income, the Supreme Court recently ruled that all amounts received by an employee as damages for an employer's violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) were taxable (Schleier, 6/14/95).