Age Discrimination in Employment Act


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Age Discrimination in Employment Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1967, that forbids discrimination against persons over the age of 40 in the hiring or firing of, and the distribution of benefits to, employees. The Act was deemed necessary because some employers were unlikely to hire otherwise qualified applicants because they were closer to retirement and therefore less likely to stay with the company. It provides for reinstatement and back pay for employees against whom companies have discriminated.
References in periodicals archive ?
This casebook contains cases and materials on the law of employment discrimination, focusing on legislative and judicial developments occurring after July 1965, the date of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and including the Reconstruction Civil Rights Acts, the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and affirmative action.
Summary: The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) turns 50 this year and it is still learning new tricks.
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits employment discrimination based on age, including discrimination in referrals by employment agencies.
Answer: The federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) applies only to employers that have "twenty or more employees for each working day in each of twenty or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.
In general, claims of discrimination against older employees allege either disparate treatment or disparate impact under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 2005.
I write in response to the Labor and Employment Law piece in the February 2010 issue ("The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967: Issues Litigated at the Supreme Court Level").
Laying off a worker based on age has been illegal since the 1967 passage of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which protects workers 40 years and older from employment discrimination based on age.
Discriminatory employment tests and selection procedures are prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, all of which are enforced by the EEOC.
The primary subject matter of this case concerns human resource management, particularly the issues of discrimination, and the Bona Fide Occupational Qualification (BFOQ) exception to Title VII of the civil rights act and the Age Discrimination in employment act.
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 is designed to protect applicants and employees age 40 and older in matters surrounding hiring, promotion, discharge, and compensation.
This report provides a brief summary of selected federal civil rights statutes, including the Civil Rights Act, the Equal Pay Act, the Voting Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Fair Housing Act, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Rehabilitation Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Equal Educational Opportunities Act, the Civil Service Reform Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Congressional Accountability Act.
Louis, charges Allstate with violations of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 for instituting a moratorium on hiring back former employee-agents, more than 90% of whom reportedly were over the age of 40.