Age Discrimination


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Related to Age Discrimination: Age Discrimination in Employment Act

Age Discrimination

The practice in which a company or other organization fires, refuses to hire, limits the benefits of or otherwise maltreats a worker of a certain age. For example, an employer may refuse to hire an otherwise qualified applicant for a position because he/she regards the applicant as too old to learn new skills. Likewise, the employer may refuse to hire a younger worker without regard for the worker's qualifications, because he/she believes young people cannot take directions. While legislation in the United States and elsewhere protects older workers from age discrimination, these laws do not necessarily protect younger employees. See also: Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Source: Huffington Post Report "Perceived Age Discrimination Worse For Health Than Perceived Racism And Sexism, Study Finds"
People''s Wales Iwan Rhys Roberts from Age Cymru said: "It's ironic that age discrimination has not been outlawed in a country which has an ageing population and today's announcement is a clear signal that we are burying our heads in the sand by failing to take assertive action to tackle legalised discrimination.
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), passed in 2005 promotes the employment of older persons based on their ability and not their age, prohibits arbitrary age discrimination in employment, and assists employers and employees in finding ways to meet the problems arising from the impact of age on employment (Mujtaba and Cavico, 2010).
Following on from that, she was, the tribunal has decided, victimised on the basis of her age discrimination claim.
In the first quarter, it identified a 10% increase in age discrimination lawsuits nationally compared with the first quarter of 2008.
The Government has said it will take around 18 months to draft regulations on how rules relating to age discrimination in health and social care should be implemented.
Whilst many commentators were sympathetic to Ms Stewart, the general tone of the reaction to Selina Scott's claim was scathing, with the implication being that age discrimination - real or perceived - is not generally seen as a proper subject for complaint here in the UK.
In a landmark victory, a 66-year-old health worker has won her job back, after being sacked the day before new age discrimination regulations came into effect.
At my age, the jobs available to me are minimum wage jobs," he said, adding, "There is age discrimination out there.
However, the Act establishes a standard for all defined-benefit plans that clarifies current law with respect to age discrimination under ERISA.