Advance Directive

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Advance Directive

A legal document expressing a person's medical wishes in the event of his/her mental or physical incapacity. An advance directive is made while the director is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. An advance directive may state whether or not the director wishes to be placed on life support or to receive a particular treatment. It may or may not assign another party, usually a family member, to make these decisions as they come up. It is important to note that in this situation, an advance directive is not a power of attorney and neither allows the other party access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges him/her to pay for any treatment. See also: Proxy directive.
References in periodicals archive ?
That primary care nurses articulate their position about the use of advance directives was highlighted:
sixty were more likely than younger adults to have advance directives.
Through these workshops, participants will gain a better understanding of what advance directives are and the choices we all have in terms of end-of-life care.
Advance directives fail to convey the patient's actual treatment choice; instead, they supply evidence of what the individual would want in the later-developing treatment situation.
The new advance directive form contains space to write down directions to health providers about specific treatments or procedures.
The degree to which advance directives actually direct providers to limit medical interventions has been found questionable (GAO, 1995; The SUPPORT Principal Investigators, 1995), yet advance directives remain highly valued by practitioners (Drought & Koenig, 2002; Osman & Perlin, 1994), probably because they provide some legal authority and guidance for future treatment preferences.
The man did not have an advance directive, so the social service coordinator asked him if he wanted to be resuscitated in the event that his heart stopped beating.
It is about much more than advance directives but given the focus of debate, we have produced a specific briefing on this one issue; Advance directives are an important mechanism that people can use to inform medical professionals about the type of care they do not want to receive and must remain part of the Mental Capacity Bill; Advance directives will not lead to euthanasia;
The Association of American Medical Colleges is in the process of investigating advance directives, and it is possible that their implementation might be added to the curricula of the 126 American medical schools.
An advance directive gives the patient and his or her loved ones control over the level of care being rendered in the last illness, and it permits physicians to know exactly what the patient wishes in terms of the intensity of care.
Advance directives protect individual rights and cost little or nothing to carry out.
Advance directives in an intensive care unit: Experiences and recommendations of critical care nurses and physicians.

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