Advance Directive


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Advance Directive

A legal document expressing a person's medical wishes in the event of his/her mental or physical incapacity. An advance directive is made while the director is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. An advance directive may state whether or not the director wishes to be placed on life support or to receive a particular treatment. It may or may not assign another party, usually a family member, to make these decisions as they come up. It is important to note that in this situation, an advance directive is not a power of attorney and neither allows the other party access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges him/her to pay for any treatment. See also: Proxy directive.
References in periodicals archive ?
she had to be in the right space"), this experience led to establishing an advance directive policy within the workplace.
Purposive sample of registered nurses (n=14), attending physicians (n=7) and fellow physicians (n=3) with advanced training in critical care medicine, consenting to provide information about the use of advance directives in the care of their patients at high risk for death in this ICU.
When patients in high-spending areas had advance directives limiting treatment, they averaged significantly lower end-of-life Medicare spending, were less likely to have an in-hospital death, and had significantly greater odds of hospice use than [did] decedents without advance directives in these regions," Dr.
An illustrative approach to the use of empowerment in this context can be seen in statements from Virginia's Commission on Mental Health Law Reform (2007): The Commission states that in order to "facilitate engagement and empowerment of persons [italics added]" with SMI, there should be an emphasis on individual choice in mental health statutes, regulations, policies, and practices, which would include the use of crisis plans and advance directives in the event of impaired decisional capacity and make discussion of such plans a standard part of treatment.
As a result, few advance directives are made with the understanding that underlies genuine self-determination.
Third, the advance directive now covers other medical conditions.
a new illness, the advance of an existing one, or incapacitation) occurs, refer to the advance directive when making all decisions.
Little is known about the degree to which social services staff discuss treatment decisions beyond DNR orders, few have attempted to confirm criticisms of advance directive implementation problems with practitioners, and few have asked about social services workers' attitudes about and knowledge of life-sustaining interventions commonly considered for older adults in end-stage dementia.
Through these workshops, participants will gain a better understanding of what advance directives are and the choices we all have in terms of end-of-life care.
Much of the debate on the Mental Capacity Bill so far has focused on the issue of advance directives and withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration.
The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations is evaluating the possibility of requiring all acute general hospitals to create registries of advance directives, and the University of California, San Francisco, will require all medical students beginning in September 2004 to fill out a personal advance directive.
An advance directive gives the patient and his or her loved ones control over the level of care being rendered in the last illness, and it permits physicians to know exactly what the patient wishes in terms of the intensity of care.

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