Real

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Real

Used in the context of general equities. (1) natural, (2) not dividend roll-or program trading-related; (3) not tax-related. "Real" indications have three major repercussions: a) pricing will be more favorable to the other side of the trade since an investment bank is not committing any capital; b) price pressure will be stronger if real since a natural buyer/seller may have information leading to his decision or more behind it, and c) an uptick may be required for the trader to transact if the indication is not real and the trader has no long position.

Real

1. Describing a variable that takes inflation into account. For example, when considering GDP growth, if GDP has grown 10% in dollar terms, and the inflation rate is 3%, real GDP growth is only 7%. See also: Nominal.

2. See: Tangible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The principal amount of a TIPS will be adjusted for inflation and deflation based on monthly changes in the nonseasonally adjusted US.
defense budget, adjusted for inflation, is about 40 percent below its level in 1985, the peak year for defense spending since the Korean War, the Pentagon says.
The deductions are reduced by 3% of the excess of adjusted gross income (AGI) over $100,000 ($50,000 for married individuals filing separately), adjusted for inflation beginning in 1992.
And oil prices, adjusted for inflation, are still lower than they were between 1975 and 1980.
Average family income nationally for the poorest 20 percent: $12,990, down $900 since the late 1970s when adjusted for inflation.
How can last year's wages, after being adjusted for inflation, be barely higher than in 1989 and actually lower than in 1969?
Not seeking any rate increases for another five years will similarly act as a further reduction in rates for customers when adjusted for inflation.
On the other end, however, the benefits are adjusted for inflation.
Although California lost jobs in 2003, the average annual wage for employees in the technology industry increased from $80,800 in 2002 to $84,400 in 2003, adjusted for inflation.
Gasoline prices, already at a 28-year low when adjusted for inflation, are likely headed even lower, the California Energy Commission reported.
The effect would build on itself because a lower payment next year would mean a lower starting point when the benefit was adjusted for inflation the following year.

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