Adequate Sample

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Adequate Sample

In statistics, a sample size considered to be sufficiently large to be predictive. This is important whether one is polling an election or the potential popularity of a new product. It is also important, especially in marketing, that the adequate sample include enough members of a product's target demographic.
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Therefore, it is necessary to bring all participating laboratories in an intercomparison on the determination of faecal microorganisms to the same place in order to provide them with adequate samples.
In addition, if the inventor supplies adequate samples and inventory, InventHelp can display the product at appropriate national trade shows and attempt to make sales on the inventor's behalf.
Adequate samples were obtained in 86% of cases and malignant lymph node involvement was assessed in 72 % of cases [7].
Accurately assessing these research topics depends, however, on adequate samples (again, 200 is a bare minimum and 300 or more is preferable), professional questionnaire design and interpretation by researchers who understand supermarket retailing and consumer behavior.
The sensitivity (60 to 100%) and specificity (87 to 100%) of image-guided thyroid FNAB are also relatively high, and this technique yields a high rate of adequate samples (96%).
Blending with the rural culture and finding adequate samples in rural areas remain a challenge and reinforce the fact that research in the rural context is unique.
In the development of well-designed standardized psychological tests or inventories, established procedures for test development must be followed, such as developing items for the inventory, testing the items on adequate samples, and analyzing results (Hood & Johnson, 1997).
Phoenix households were surveyed again in October to obtain statistically adequate samples of teachers and business users.
Due to the difficulty of obtaining adequate samples for microbiological testing, physicians rely on empiric therapies that can cover key pathogens, particularly resistant and susceptible strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae.
An analysis of seniors' support networks including children who are caring for an elderly parent is included, as are more than 25 therapeutic areas with adequate samples sizes.
Actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to: (a) our ability to get adequate samples from patients with colon cancer; (b) the ability of our collaborators to perform chip-based SNP genotyping; (c) whether the Company will have sufficient financing to conduct its research and development; (d) how competition from existing or new competitors will impact the Company's business; (e) the success of physicians to whom we license our treatments; and (f) economic, regulatory, governmental, and technological factors which may affect the Company's business.