Bill of Enclosure

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Bill of Enclosure

An act of the British Parliament that joined two or more strips of land into a single property. Since the Middle Ages, English landowners could, by mutual consent, join their properties into an enclosure, which consolidated use of land and was thus beneficial for farming. Many large landowners around villages enclosed their lands, leaving small landowners with patches surrounded by large tracts. The large landowners could petition Parliament to force the small landowners to cede their land to the enclosure. Parliament did this by passing a bill of enclosure. Bills of enclosure were passed most commonly in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. See also: Eminent domain.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Our present historical moment is characterised by hitherto unparalleled acts of enclosure.
Given this continuity and intensification across the ages, it behooves us to turn back to the historical record to examine the ways in which these original acts of enclosure, which Marx famously termed 'primitive accumulation,' were legitimated.
While seeking to legitimate acts of enclosure in both England and her colonies, Locke thus also records a negative image of the suffering and struggles catalysed by this first great unpeopling.
In addition, the blindness to acts of enclosure imposed by Marx's theory of primitive accumulation also obscured what David Harvey describes as the 'organically linked, dialectically intertwined' character of struggles in the field of expanded reproduction and around new enclosures.
If these initial global acts of enclosure provided the wealth that fuelled the capitalist system in its incipient phase, the contradictions of the system emerged relatively quickly.
It is at this moment that we can begin to make out the dialectical relation between struggles over expanded reproduction and acts of enclosure.
Marzec inaugurates this turn toward the question of a people's integral/rhizomatic relation to the land and to the potential resistance to acts of enclosure and colonization by way of extremely original deconstructive readings of Thomas Hardy's Return of the Native (1878), D.
Nearly all acts of enclosure in England from the fifteenth century through the nineteenth can be justified economically.
The Georgian era marked not only an increase in Acts of Enclosure but also in anti-tithing sentiment.