Absolutism

(redirected from Absolutists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Absolutists: absolutism

Absolutism

The political theory that all power should belong to the state. According to absolutism, every corporation, religious organization, or other institution must give way to the state. Absolutism comes from the period in European history before and during the early development of capitalism during which monarchs attempted to centralize power. See also: Fascism.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Hate mail written to Reginald Porcas, an absolutist conscientious objector from Norbury, south London, in the Second World War, accuses him of being a "dirty sniffling coward".
Absolutist rhetoric can also distort an ongoing constitutional debate.
Even so, market absolutists, along with many emerging market economy leaders, appear to be waiting for the market to work its magic and U.
Recall that absolutists are low on relativism (thus subscribing to universal moral precepts) and high on idealism (thus having acute concern about a given behavior's impact on others).
Family practitioners and absolutists were more supportive of religious activities and had parents who were more religious than those of psychiatrists and relativists.
Not a Quaker himself, but a deep admirer, Kennedy's initial interest in the Friends stemmed from his earlier work on the No-Conscription Fellowship and a consequent encounter with the absolutists of the Friends Service Committee.
Utilizing these five principles of relativism, a common learning environment becomes possible for the student relativists who feel "that's your idea" and "whose to say"; the absolutists who insist that "a truth is always true"; and the instructor who is a critical realist.
In a situation where Muslims' material life as well as self-respect is increasingly threatened by alarming majoritarian tendencies--especially since the accession to power of the Hindu-nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party--the absolutist, doctrinal side of the double movement holds out a promise of dignity and autonomy in the name of Islam, especially among the young.
Douglas, an absolutist on press freedom, looked down at Bickel and asked:
The most serious weakness in her argument, however, is that it fails to address the basic fact that the body of English opinion that was most receptive to absolutist arguments in the 1590s was the conformist wing of the Church of England, and it had more immediate sources than the Politique tracts.
As the monarchy and its absolutist allies applied coercive measures (such as refusal of sacraments) to compel acceptance of Unigenitus, Jansenist resistance grew ever stronger.
But cultural absolutists simultaneously argue that human rights are a universal ideal.