Absolutism


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Absolutism

The political theory that all power should belong to the state. According to absolutism, every corporation, religious organization, or other institution must give way to the state. Absolutism comes from the period in European history before and during the early development of capitalism during which monarchs attempted to centralize power. See also: Fascism.
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The name of the patient is interreligious dialogue, showing symptoms like religious uniqueness, superiority, and theological absolutism.
I refer to that tenet as the new absolutism, (26) by which I mean that line of cases in which the Court has extended near absolute protection to expression for a particular reason, about which I will say more shortly.
24) As a result, we are caught between a rock and a hard place: moral relativism (in the plurality of faiths or moral authorities) and moral absolutism (in the dogmatism of faiths or moral authorities).
To "suffer with" is not a popular calling that quickly fills parking lots and entry-ways, yet to this age of instant success and "either/or" absolutism (what I have often called the idolatry of certainty) the rich heritage of Loehe brings a "both/and" word of grace.
Dissent from a traditional norm, the coexistence of opposing religious groups, the intimate juxtaposition of differing faiths in the age of absolutism have for recent historiography an attraction that can only be heightened by association with the process of secularization.
These claims on behalf of absolutism, of course, did not go unchallenged.
Thus, the West transitioned from one sort of absolutism to another.
LaPierre's was particularly critical of one section of Obama's address, where the president said, "We cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or substitute spectacle for politics, or treat name-calling as reasoned debate.
Drawn from a February 2003 conference sponsored by the Integritas Institute (with one exception), the papers situate debates over abortion, euthanasia, and competing conceptions of health in the context of the "culture war;" consider the philosophical roots of the debate in terms of moral absolutism versus moral relativism; and offer observations on how to apply Catholic moral philosophy to political and legal debates about biotechnology, marriage, and the family.
I'm not saying that we should counter religious absolutism with our "weird spirituality," as one Southern Baptist pundit put it.
If you are tempted to repeat the experiment in this age of moral absolutism, be forewarned: The researchers report male/male pairs got a bigger boost than female/female or male/female pairs.
And then it suggests that they are both wrong because the answer lies beyond both absolutism and relativism.