Pure Risk

(redirected from Absolute Risks)

Pure Risk

Any risk in which there is no possibility of gain, only the avoidance of loss. For example, if a company car is stolen, the company endures a loss, but if it is not stolen, the company does not make a gain. Individuals and companies purchase insurance to mitigate the potential damage from a loss from pure risk. It is also called absolute risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although our analysis strongly supports the validity of the associations that were observed, the increase in the absolute risks, if the associations are causal, is small," the researchers wrote.
Although absolute risks for neuropathy are low, CD is a potentially treatable condition with a young age of onset.
Further research is needed to determine the absolute risks of cancer associated with each mutation and "to better understand what level of risk difference will change decision making and standards of care, such as preventive surgery" for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, Dr.
The researchers defined the absolute risks of rehospitalisation and death on each day during the full year after discharge.
This means that an individual who gets richer is willing to take higher absolute risks.
However, the researchers behind the study said the absolute risks for people with migraine and aura are still low.
Despite the low absolute risks during non-hospitalised periods, these results suggest that active inflammatory bowel disease in ambulatory patients might be a far greater risk factor for venous thromboembolism than previously recognised," he added.
Absolute Risks and Odds Ratio are used in this article to investigate the risk of becoming sick with TB.
Absolute risks are measured in terms of simple, unqualified relationships or likelihoods, such as four persons per 100,000 or 22% of a given population.
Absolute risks are typically small numbers while corresponding relative changes tend to look big, particularly when the base rate is low.
Absolute risk reduction (ARR) is the difference between absolute risks in two groups.
Gaziano is indeed correct that the actual absolute risks are not stated in the Guideline, and this is an omission.