Abatement Cost

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Abatement Cost

The expense a business incurs as a result of cleaning or removing an undesired byproduct of its goods and services. Abatement cost is often associated with large manufacturing plants that must abide by environmental standards or city noise ordinances. However, it may apply to a small business also. For example, a dental office must bear the cost of disposing of medically hazardous material.
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An environmental survey done by the state in 2012 estimated the environmental abatement costs for the property to be about $1.
note 9, at 697 (discussing the variation of abatement costs for sources
They show that if the regulator's objective is to minimize aggregate emissions, it is optimal to bias the monitoring scheme against firms that value pollution less, that is, firms with lower abatement costs.
Air pollution abatement costs may be rising, especially if the EPA follows through and declares its sulfur dioxide levels to be in nonattainment status.
The IAMs "integrate" a description of GHG emissions and their effect on temperature (a climate science model) with projections of abatement costs and a description of how changes in climate affect output, consumption, and other economic variables (an economic model).
The authors determine that demand depends on economic growth, weather conditions, relative energy prices and marginal abatement costs.
Using the regional integrated model of climate and the economy (RICE model), for example, abatement costs amount to 1.
If we ignore this rule of optimality and begin abatement now for damages caused by emissions after one hundred years, we leave our descendants with fewer resources--a hundred years of return on the abatement costs not incurred--to devote to subsequent damage control," he writes.
However, with these targets, Canada's abatement costs are likely to be higher than those in the US, owing to several factors: faster growing emissions in Canada; fewer low-cost opportunities to reduce emissions in the electricity sector due to a generation mix that already produces lower emissions; and the high costs of emissions reductions in the oil and gas sector.
This article focuses on the Texas manufacturing sector, where PACE (pollution abatement costs and expenditures) spending, perhaps surprisingly, led the nation in 2005 (most recent data available).
The pollution abatement costs in developed countries have reached levels where projects have started yielding negative returns.
Yale University economist William Nordhaus recently estimated that if emissions from half of the global economy remained uncontrolled, abatement costs would be more than twice as high as necessary.