Abatement Cost

Abatement Cost

The expense a business incurs as a result of cleaning or removing an undesired byproduct of its goods and services. Abatement cost is often associated with large manufacturing plants that must abide by environmental standards or city noise ordinances. However, it may apply to a small business also. For example, a dental office must bear the cost of disposing of medically hazardous material.
References in periodicals archive ?
59) Although trading reduces abatement cost, relative to a
Firms can invest in a new end-of-pipe technology that enables them to reduce the cost of abating emissions from the abatement cost function c(e) to the function [theta]c(e).
Informing efficiency and cost-saving decisions by providing a wide range of environmental performance analytics such as benchmarking, forecasting and marginal abatement cost analysis tools.
With a full third of compliance obtained from allowance trade with the US, the abatement cost differentials between the two countries, at least under these scenarios, would suggest that linked trade is a very important flexibility mechanism.
Census Bureau, 2008 "Pollution Abatement Cost and Expenditures, 2005.
The latest version of the McKinsey global carbon abatement cost curve identifies opportunities to stabilize emissions by 2030 at 1990 levels, or 50 percent below the "business as usual" trend line.
g] for the public abatement good implies constant marginal abatement cost (MAC).
For Japan, one of the biggest challenges to reducing domestic emissions is its abatement cost.
The objective of controlling pollution is to minimize the total costs to society, where these costs include the damages from remaining pollution and the abatement cost required to eliminate pollution.
It may be noted that the two shaded areas are equal, so that the notional revenue from the effective tax is dedicated wholly to abatement cost (including rents accruing to the owners of intra-marginal abatement opportunities)(11).