Actual Cash Value

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Actual Cash Value

Cost of replacing a property with another of the same kind and in similar condition. Calculated as the replacement cost less depreciation.

Actual Cash Value

In insurance, the cost to the insurance company to replace a good covered by a policy. The actual cash value is the original cost of the good, less depreciation and obsolescence. In order to receive coverage for a good's actual market value, that good must be listed specifically in the insurance policy. The actual cash value is related to a good's market value.
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Manufacturing nearly doubled its ACV, while telecom nearly tripled its 2013 performance.
The Americas region recorded a 43 percent increase in ACV in the fourth quarter, and finished the year up 22 percent, to $8.
Asia Pacific's record-breaking pace in the first half slowed due to a lack of large-deal activity in the third quarter, as ACV fell 27 percent and deal counts shrank by more than 30 percent.
With just seven contracts and US$100 million in ACV awarded, the BPO market continues to struggle since hitting a record high in 2012.
Deal counts are strong across the board, global ACV is surging, all three regions - Americas, Europe, and Asia Pacific - are seeing upward momentum, information technology outsourcing (ITO) continues to forge ahead, and, in a potential bright spot for the global economy, the manufacturing sector is seeing a significant rebound in deal activity and value.
In the MDR vertical, contract signings resembled Q3 activity, but ACV increased 44 percent.
2013 Vertical Industry Comparisons by 2013 ACV Spending Classification
ITO was the biggest driver of first-quarter growth, with ACV up 29 percent from last year, principally the result of a number of large new-scope awards hitting the market in the first three months of 2014.
Although contract numbers declined slightly, ACV in Japan reached $380 million, its highest level since 2007.
ISG attributed the drop in value to a number of factors, among them a fall-off in the number of "mega relationships" (those with ACV of $100 million or more); a sharp decline in activity within the manufacturing sector and, to a lesser extent, financial services; weakness in business process outsourcing (BPO), and a general trend toward smaller deal sizes.
ACV has a proven model that can help us reach our investor relations goals.
Strongest third quarter ever for both ACV and number of contracts