A

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A

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying Class A shares.

A

1. A symbol appearing next to a stock listed on NASDAQ indicating that the stock is a class A share. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if an "A" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is class A. Publicly-traded companies sometimes issue common shares of different classes, which usually affects the shares' voting rights. Class A shares usually, but not always, carry more voting rights than class B shares.

2. Indicating a class of mutual fund with a front-end load. In this case, a certain amount of one's investment is deducted for the mutual fund's salesperson's commission. This lowers the size of the investment in the mutual fund. For example, if one invests $50,000 in a mutual fund, a certain amount, say $1,000, is deducted for the commission, resulting in an investment of only $49,000 in the fund.

A

An upper-medium grade assigned to a debt obligation by a rating agency to indicate a strong capacity to pay interest and repay principal. This capacity is susceptible to impairment in the event of adverse developments.

a

1. Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate a cash payment in addition to regular dividends during the year: 2.75a.
2. Used in money market mutual fund transaction tables in newspapers to indicate a yield that may include capital gains and losses as well as current interest: AmCap Reserv a.
References in periodicals archive ?
After going into the deep freeze post-Bubble, merger and acquisition activity may be poised for a sharp rebound, says Hewitt Associates.
The organizational infrastructure measure discussed above provides a sharp focus on managers' performance and the company's growth potential by indicating abnormal productivity gains derived from given company resources.
We keep a sharp eye on advancing technology, the market and economy to remain at the cutting edge," Dugow says, explaining that he is also clear on his firm's message, its specialties and its target clients.
Hudson hit a sharp grounder to second baseman Adam Kennedy's right and into right-center field to end the game.
Posada hit a sharp grounder right to second baseman Chone Figgins, who threw Posada out.