527 Organization

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527 Organization

A tax exempt organization in the United States dedicated to supporting or opposing candidates for political office or advocating or opposing certain issues. For example, a 527 organization may be formed to campaign for or against banking regulation. Unless a 527 promotes or denigrates a specific candidate, there are no limits on its contributions or spending. However, 527s must publish the names of their contributors as well as the donations they make.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress also imposed significant disclosure burdens enforced by stiff penalties on section 527 organizations, thus mandating a cost to being described as a political organization.
This system is not only unwieldy to access, but also fails to account for political contributions made to 501(c)(4) and 527 organizations and to third parties such as trade associations, for which no contribution limits exist and no company disclosure is legally required.
They may not set up Section 527 organizations, which include political action committees (PACs).
No matter whether the money moves through candidates, PACs, parties, Section 527 organizations, or lobbying groups, Political MoneyLinecounts it.
527 organizations as well as some insight into allowable political activities for other tax-exempt organizations.
10) Soon after the Court's decision in McConnell, the FEC resurrected its Furgatch-like definition of "express advocacy" in the context of numerous enforcement actions against 501(c)(4) organizations and so-called 527 organizations that had been active in the 2004 presidential election but that refused to comply with federal "political committee" requirements and restrictions.
Section 527 organizations have long existed under federal law, but recently became a popular place for individuals, corporations, unions and other groups to donate large sums for a wide range of electioneering activity.
Many commentators think that public financing of elections, across-the-board elimination of cash spigots like the 527 organizations, and other reforms would help, but the results are hardly guaranteed.
In fact, those volunteer efforts were substantial enough to cause the Kerry-Edwards campaign and Democratic-oriented 527 organizations such as Moveon.
Despite assertions that soft money spending, or unregulated contributions to Section 527 organizations, is going unchecked, the Federal Election Commission (FEC) voted against new spending limits at this time, tabling the issue for at least three months.
Both sides of this debate agree that the primary target of these new rules is actually 527 organizations like the liberal MoveOn.