Standard Industrial Classification Code

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Standard Industrial Classification Code

A four digit code used in business to classify the industry to which a company belongs. The SIC code was created by the U.S. government in 1937 to facilitate communication within and between businesses and industries. For the most part, the SIC was replaced by the six digit NAICS in 1997, but the SEC still uses the SIC. For example, an oil & gas exploration company might file with the SEC under the SIC code 1382.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new reference material (RM), RM 8504, has been prepared for use as a diluent oil with Aroclors in transformer oil Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) 3075 to 3080 and SRM 3090 when developing and validating methods for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as Aroclors in transformer oil or similar matrices.
RM 8504, Transformer Oil, is intended to be used as a diluent oil with transformer oil Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) 3075 to 3080 and SRM 3090 [1] when developing and validating methods for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as Aroclors (1) in transformer oil or similar matrices.
The blower has been upgraded from 5 hp to 10 hp, increasing throughput from 925 lb/hr to 3080 lb/hr over a distance of 400 ft.
Of all the plasma cutters in the industry, only the Spectrum 2050 and Spectrum 3080 plasma cutters consistently cut steel greater than 3/8" when using auxiliary power, Miller says.
The Spectrum 2050 and 3080 respectively deliver 55 and 80 amps of cutting power arid weigh just 70 and 74 pounds.
Although safety in plants of Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 3080 (Miscellaneous Plastics Products) is improving faster than the manufacturing average, the frequency of injuries resulting in lost workdays was 21% higher than the U.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) show that accident rates for SIC 3080 ("Miscellaneous Plastics Products") remained well above the average for all manufacturing in 1997, the most recent year for which figures were available at press time.
When accident reports for SICs other than 3080 are taken into account, fatalities in plastics processing probably numbered more than 20.