30-Year Treasury

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30-Year Treasury

A debt security owed by the United States government for a period of 30 years. Each 30-year Treasury has a stated interest rate, which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see 30-year Treasury interest rates as indicative of the state of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for 30-year Treasury securities and rises with lower demand. As with other U.S. Treasury securities, 30-year Treasuries are negotiable and may be traded on an exchange or over-the-counter. See also: yield, bond, treasury note, treasury bond, treasury bill.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yields on 30-year Treasury securities fell 17 basis points to 3.
Thereafter, the coupon will adjust quarterly to 45 basis points above the higher of the rate on 3-month, 10-year, or 30-year Treasury securities.
PV for these purposes must be no less than the PV determined by using the annual interest rate on 30-year Treasury securities for the month before the distribution date, or such earlier time as provided in regulations.
The Aviator Cash Balance Program includes the Payden/Kravitz Cash Balance Plan investment option, an institutionally managed investment strategy specifically developed for cash-balance plans that seeks to track to the 30-year Treasury Securities Interest Rate.
After April 1, 2006, the coupon will adjust quarterly to 50 basis points above the higher of the rate on 3-month, 10-year, or 30-year Treasury securities.
The Payden/Kravitz Cash Balance Plan Fund seeks to earn a net rate of return, after fees and expenses, which is equivalent to the yield on 30-year Treasury Securities Interest Rate, as defined annually by the IRS.
Yields on 30-year Treasury securities are down by about 50 basis points; yields on two- to five-year maturities are down a stunning 100 basis points or more.
A discount rate tied to the yield on 30-year Treasury securities now applies, but authorization for that rate expires at the end of the year, forcing Congress to move quickly in passing pension reform legislation.