30-Year Treasury

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30-Year Treasury

A debt security owed by the United States government for a period of 30 years. Each 30-year Treasury has a stated interest rate, which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see 30-year Treasury interest rates as indicative of the state of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for 30-year Treasury securities and rises with lower demand. As with other U.S. Treasury securities, 30-year Treasuries are negotiable and may be traded on an exchange or over-the-counter. See also: yield, bond, treasury note, treasury bond, treasury bill.
References in periodicals archive ?
Levis stated that contrary to these institutions the elimination of 30 year treasury bond and any related unexpected reduction in long term interest rates should not have a material adverse impact on the Company's operations.
On March 14, 1994, and the next trading day, on March 15, 1994, the price of the 30 year treasury bond fell a 3/4 of a point, driving up the yield from 6.
Brogan will also be discussing the following indices: NYSE Composite Daily, McClellan Oscillator, Dow Jones Industrials (DJIA), NASDAQ Advance Decline Line, NASDAQ Composite Daily (COMP), S & P 500 Index, 30 Year Treasury Bond (TBOND), American Biotech Daily (BTK), and American Internet Index (IIX).