30-Year Treasury

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30-Year Treasury

A debt security owed by the United States government for a period of 30 years. Each 30-year Treasury has a stated interest rate, which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see 30-year Treasury interest rates as indicative of the state of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for 30-year Treasury securities and rises with lower demand. As with other U.S. Treasury securities, 30-year Treasuries are negotiable and may be traded on an exchange or over-the-counter. See also: yield, bond, treasury note, treasury bond, treasury bill.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yields on the 30 year Treasury bonds began the year below 60 percent and started its continuous ascent in mid-February to above seven percent by the beginning of May.
Levis stated that contrary to these institutions the elimination of 30 year treasury bond and any related unexpected reduction in long term interest rates should not have a material adverse impact on the Company's operations.
On March 14, 1994, and the next trading day, on March 15, 1994, the price of the 30 year treasury bond fell a 3/4 of a point, driving up the yield from 6.
Brogan will also be discussing the following indices: NYSE Composite Daily, McClellan Oscillator, Dow Jones Industrials (DJIA), NASDAQ Advance Decline Line, NASDAQ Composite Daily (COMP), S & P 500 Index, 30 Year Treasury Bond (TBOND), American Biotech Daily (BTK), and American Internet Index (IIX).