Securities Exchange Act of 1934

(redirected from 1934 Act)

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Legislation that created the SEC, outlawing dishonest practices in the trading of securities.

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Legislation in the United States that regulated broker-dealers and secondary trades on American stock exchanges. This Act also created the Securities and Exchange Commission to help it accomplish its goals. The act prohibited certain trades that would unfairly or dangerously manipulate prices. For example, the Act forbids churning, in which an investor makes both buy and sell orders through different brokers to create the impression of increased interest in the security and to raise the price. It was one of the most important regulatory laws that came out of the New Deal.

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

Landmark legislation that established the SEC and that gives it authority over proxy solicitation and registration of organized exchanges. In addition, the Act sets disclosure requirements for securities in the secondary market, regulates insider trading, and gives the Federal Reserve authority over credit purchases of securities. When established, the Act reflected an effort to extend and overcome shortcomings of the Securities Act of 1933. These two pieces of legislation are the basis of securities regulation in the twentieth century. See also Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Williams Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Section 2(b) of the 1934 Act, however, specifically withholds jurisdiction from the Commission with regard to intrastate services, subject to a number of exceptions.
Think of the glaring omission from the public disclosure requirements of the 1934 Act of the vast array of companies that had not registered new securities offerings and the securities of which were not listed and traded on exchanges.
The primary purposes of the Securities Act of 1933 and the 1934 act were to protect investors and promote market stability and efficiency.
The debate surrounding the 1934 act was superficial, unpublicized, and both the debate and the act essentially ratified the coup d'etat.
Such ownership interests will, however, be considered securities for the purposes of the anti-fraud provisions found in Section 17 of the 1933 act and Section 10 of the 1934 act.
The complaint charges Par Pharma and its Board and TPG with violations of the 1934 Act.
Coverage includes public offerings, offerings exempt from US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) registration, the 1934 Act registration and integrated disclosure requirements, mergers and acquisitions, market regulators and market participants, and financial instruments.
i) Sections 10A(m), 12, 13, 14(a), 14(c), 14(d), 14(f) and 16 of the 1934 Act (15 U.
In response to the complaint, the firm filed a motion to dismiss pursuant to rules 12(b)(6) and 9(b) of the 1934 Act.
The banking industry contended that having several employer groups as members violated the 1934 act.
By comparison to the SEC's objectives under the 1934 Act, the intent under Sec.