Civil Rights Act of 1866

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Civil Rights Act of 1866

Passed after the Civil War, this Act declared that all persons born in the

United States were citizens of the United States without regard to race,color,or previous condition of servitude.All citizens were entitled to enter into and enforce contracts,and to buy,sell,lease,inherit, and pass by inheritance real and personal property. It prohibited discrimination in housing, but provided no enforcement mechanism other than private lawsuits. It was not until 102 years later, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, that antidiscrimination laws could be truly enforced through federal actions.

References in periodicals archive ?
legislation that was embodied in the 1866 Civil Rights Act.
Although Jones's approval of the 1866 Civil Rights Act was
Nor is there any indication in the 1866 Civil Rights Act and Fourteenth Amendment debates that other senators (incorrectly) understood Trumbull as making consensualist arguments.
In a second writing assignment, ask them to incorporate their initial analysis of the 1866 Civil Rights Act with insights gained from their research.
Whatever else its enactors may have intended, scholars agree that the Fourteenth Amendment was intended to constitutionalize the rights in the 1866 Civil Rights Act.
When Senator Lyman Trumbull, the draftsman and Senate sponsor of the 1866 Civil Rights Act, was asked by a fellow Senator to explain his interpretation of the term "civil rights", Trumbull replied, "The first section of the bill defines what I understand to be civil rights[.
Though helpful to his ultimate viewpoint, Moore's treatment of citizenship omits any account of Attorney General Bates's 1862 opinion defining citizenship in a way that denied the legitimacy of Dred Scott or the citizenship clause of the 1866 Civil Rights Act.
McCrary, a 1976 decision that had revitalized the 1866 Civil Rights Act prohibiting discrimination in private contracts.
The 1866 Civil Rights Act differs significantly from the Fair Housing Act of 1968 in several ways.
In 1968, the Court ruled 7 to 2 that a section of the 1866 Civil Rights Act barred private discrimination in housing.
McCrary, which ruled that the 1866 Civil Rights Act forbade racial discrimination in the private sector.