Standard Industrial Classification Code

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Standard Industrial Classification Code

A four digit code used in business to classify the industry to which a company belongs. The SIC code was created by the U.S. government in 1937 to facilitate communication within and between businesses and industries. For the most part, the SIC was replaced by the six digit NAICS in 1997, but the SEC still uses the SIC. For example, an oil & gas exploration company might file with the SEC under the SIC code 1382.
References in periodicals archive ?
SARGODHA -- The Punjab Emergency Service, Rescue 1122 responded to 1389 emergency calls in February last, District Emergency Officer, Mazhar Shah said on Tuesday.
A study assessing the tolerability and safety of zonisamide in elderly patients with partial epilepsy which used a pooled analysis of data from 95 elderly patients over 65 years and compared to pooled data from 1389 adults (18-65 years).
North Dakota became the 37[th] state to enact a comprehensive law requiring the registration and oversight of appraisal management companies on April 12 when House Bill 1389 was signed into law by Gov.
The lack of accountability is astounding, especially in light of the fact that not one bishop's feet have been held to the fire under criminal canon 1389.
The official said that cultural tourists consisted the majority of foreign tourists visiting Iran in the year 1389 (March 2010-2011), which were mainly from European countries, including Germany and France.
820 billion during the current Iranian calendar year 1389 (ending 20 March 2011).
The developmental budget for the year 1389 was presented to the Wolesi Jirga by Finance Minister Hazrat Omar Zakhelwal a few days ago.
In 1389, Gazimestan was the site of the Battle of Kosovo, between the Serbian and the Ottoman armies, resulting in the defeat of the former.
Murad I (1326-1389) was the ruler of the Ottoman Empire from 1359 to 1389.
In 1389 Serbia was a thriving, prosperous and chivalrous country.
However, much of the work at Kenilworth was done by John of Gaunt, the son of King Edward III, between 1389 and 1394.