10-K

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10-K

Annual report required by the SEC each year. Provides a comprehensive overview of a company's state of business. Must be filed within 90 days after fiscal year-end. A 10-Q report is filed quarterly.

10-K

A form the SEC requires publicly-traded companies and some private companies to file every year. It includes statements on equity and audited financials. While similar to the annual report to shareholders, it often contains more information, such as executive compensation and organizational structure. All publicly traded companies and any privately traded companies with more than 500 shareholders and $10 million in assets are required to file a 10-K. The SEC requires companies to provide the 10-K form to any shareholder who requests it and to state on the form whether or not the company's financials are available for free online. See also: Transparency.

10-K

An annual report of a firm's operations filed with the SEC. Compared with the typical annual report sent to stockholders, a 10-K is much less physically attractive; however, it contains many more detailed operating and financial statistics, including information on legal proceedings and management compensation. A firm's stockholders may obtain a free copy of the 10-K by writing to the corporate treasurer. Also called Form 10-K.

10-k.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires that all publicly traded companies file a Form 10-k every year. The filing date, ranging from 60 to 90 days after the end of a company's fiscal year, depends on the value of the publicly held shares.

The 10-k discloses detailed information about a company's finances, including total sales, sales by product line or division for the past five years, revenue, operating income, earnings per share, and equity, as well as other corporate information such as by-laws, organizational structure, holdings, subsidiaries, lawsuits in which the company is involved, and the company's history.

A company's Form 10-k becomes public information once it is filed, and you can find the report in the SEC's EDGAR database. As an investor, you can learn more about a company from its 10-k than from its less detailed annual report.